Trillium Ridge Flora and Fauna
Dicots - 60 species
Class: Magnoliopsida (Dicots)
Phylum/Division: Magnoliophyta (Flowering plants)
Kingdom: Plantae (Plants)
Click here for TrilliumRidge homepage; links to other pages.     Alphabetical index for this page


Golden Alexander
Zizia aurea
This lovely native of the eastern U.S. offers delicate, lemon-yellow broccoli-like flowers in late spring to early summer. Flowers last for weeks. Plants grow to about 2 feet tall and half as wide.
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Genus: Zizia (Zizia)
Family: Apiaceae (umbellifers)
Order: Apiales (apiales)
Rattlesnake Master
Eryngium yuccifolium
Front meadow north end by bench; Central front bed; sw prairie
from Minnesota east to Ohio and south to Texas and Florida.
A common herbaceous perennial plant, native to the tallgrass prairies of central and eastern North America. In the past, the dried seedheads of Rattlesnake Master were used as rattles by Amerindians. Pioneers thought the roots could be used as an effective antidote to rattlesnake bite, hence the common name of this plant. However, this belief was erroneous.This is a very odd member of the Carrot family that resembles a yucca or some other desert plant. However, it is a true tallgrass prairie species with a unique appearance.
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Genus: Eryngium (Eryngium)
Family: Apiaceae (umbellifers)
Order: Apiales (apiales)
Calico Aster
Aster lateriflorus
several spots along driveway
Brighten up the fall woodland garden with the unique flowers of this fine Aster. A myriad of white blooms with maroon and yellow centers cover the two to three foot tall stems in autumn. Flowers for an extended period, often right up to the first frost. Prefers well-drained soils, in partial to full shade. Add Calico Aster to woodland edges and open woodlands for a burst of late season color!
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Genus: Aster (asters)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Prairie dock
Silphium terebinthinaceum
Western meadow
Prairie dock belongs to the Aster (Asteraceae) family and has clusters of large, sandpapery, spade-shaped basal leaves up to 16 inches long. The flower heads are in an open cluster at the top of a smooth, shiny, nearly leafless 2 to 10 foot tall stalk. Each individually stalked flower head is 2 to 3 inches wide with several broad, shiny, green, rounded bracts and 12 to 25 yellow, petal-like ray flowers with notched tips surrounding yellow disk flowers. Prairie dock is drought-resistant and is a long-lived perennial with a fragrant, resinous sap. Prairie dock blooms summer to fall and is found in deep-soil and loamy prairies in the eastern half of the tallgrass region, but rare or absent from western Missouri westward. Prairie dock is among the tallest and largest-leaved of the prairie plants. In open prairies, the leaves of Prairie dock often orient themselves along a north-south axis to minimize heat load.
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Genus: Silphium (rosinweed)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Cupplant
Silphium perfoliatum
Front meadow
This is the single best species that you can plant for the birds. It provides food,water and cover, three of the main requirements for good avian habitat.The large leaves clasp the square stems to form little cups, hence its name.These cups catch and store rainwater, often for many days. Birds and butterflies come for a drink and hummingbirds regularly visit our plants at the nursery. In fall, goldfinches descend upon the plants to devour the seeds. Plant in groups of three to five to create a three to ten foot tall bird haven. Occurs naturally in moist environments, but does perfectly well when planted in fertile medium soils, in full sun to partial shade. Give it plenty of room to spread out, as it does self-sow readily on open soil.
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Genus: Silphium (rosinweed)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
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Compass plant
Silphium laciniatum
Western meadow, southwest meadow
This is a typical plant of black soil prairies in the tallgrass region.
A mature specimen of this native perennial plant ranges from 6-12' tall. They resemble wild sunflowers in overall size, shape, and structure. A large central taproot can extend 15 ft. into the ground. A resinous substance is produced by the upper stem when the plant is blooming. This plant can live up to 100 years.
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Genus: Silphium (rosinweed)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Sweet Joe Pye Weed
Eupatorium purpureum 
south fenceline midway; also under hickories at woods edge
This is one of the few woodland plants that attracts butterflies in droves! The large pink flowers appear in late summer and early fall, and are much sought after by Monarchs, Swallowtails and numerous other butterflies.The highly textured leaves are attractive all summer long. Grows four to six feet tall in rich, medium soil.Very versatile, it thrives in shaded woodlands or full sun and makes an excellent garden plant.
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Genus: Eupatorium (herbaceous perennial plants)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Spotted Joe Pye weed
Eupatorium maculatum 
Rain garden @ nw corner
From Missouri east to the Atlantic Ocean and as far north as Ontario and Quebec south to Kentucky.
Eupatorium: from Greek name Mithridates Eupator, King of Pontus about 115BC who is said to have discovered an antidote to a commonly used poison in one of the species. At home in wetlands in the wild, spotted Joe-Pye weeds are a good choice when you need plants for wet soils. They attracts butterflies, including tiger swallowtails and black swallowtails. Prefers moist soil. Tolerates inundation up to a depth of 6 inches early in the season, as in damp meadows, open marshes, and fens. Tolerates flooding for short periods in the spring. 4-6 ft
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Genus: Eupatorium (herbaceous perennial plants)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
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Brown eyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba
western meadow, north meadow in back
Photo is mix of several prairie flowers in our western meadow's first year. Black and brown-eyed susans, prairies dock, compass plant…
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Genus: Rudbeckia (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
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Black eyed susan
Rudbeckia hirta
Western meadow
Photo is mix of several prairie flowers in our western meadow's first year. Black and brown-eyed susans, prairies dock, compass plant…
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Genus: Rudbeckia (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Yellow coneflower
Echinacea paradoxa
Western meadow
A robust, drought tolerant perennial, native to the midwestern and southeastern United States.
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Genus: Echinacea (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Pale purple coneflower
Echinacea pallida
Western meadow
A robust, drought tolerant perennial, native to the midwestern and southeastern United States.
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Genus: Echinacea (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
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Narrow-leaved purple coneflower
Echinacea angustifolia
Western meadow
A robust, drought tolerant perennial, native to the midwestern and southeastern United States.
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Genus: Echinacea (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Purple coneflower
Echinacea purpurea
Western meadow
A robust, drought tolerant perennial, native to the midwestern and southeastern United States.
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Genus: Echinacea (coneflower)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Balsam ragwort
Packera paupercula
North meadow back yard
Another of the silent auction acquisitions.
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Genus: Packera (Packera)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
White Snakeroot
Ageratina altissima
Woods, sw meadow
eastern N,. America
Plants are found in woods and brush thickets where they bloom mid to late summer or fall. The flowers are a clean white color and after blooming small seeds with fluffy white tails are released to blow in the wind. Contains the toxin tremetol; tremetol poisoning is also called milk sickness, as humans often ingested the toxin by drinking the milk of cows who had eaten snakeroot. It was the cause of death of Nancy Hanks, mother of Abraham Lincoln.
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Genus: Ageratina (Snakeroot)
Family: Asteraceae (compositae ( aster, daisy, or sunflower family))
Order: Asterales (asterales)
Japanese Spurge
Pachysandra terminalis
North side under white pine
A dense, lustrous evergreen, trailing vine-type of ground cover, white flowers, spring.
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Genus: Pachysandra (pachysandra)
Family: Buxaceae (boxwood)
Order: Buxales (buxales)
Fire pink
Silene virginica
central bed in front
Fire Pink grows in open woods and rocky deciduous slopes in eastern North America, ranging as far north as extreme southern Ontario.
Fire pink is protected as a state endangered species in Wisconsin and Florida, and as a state threatened species in Michigan. Fire Pink's principal pollinator is the Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris), which is attracted by the flowers bright red petals and sugary nectar.
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Genus: Silene (Catchflys and campions)
Family: Caryophyllaceae (Pink family; carnation family)
Order: Caryophyllales (caryophyllales)
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Azalea Sp?
Rhododendron Pentanthera
By front porch
Azaleas are flowering shrubs making up part of the genus Rhododendron. Originally azaleas were classed as a different genus of plant, but now they are recognised as two of the eight sub-genera of rhododendrons - subgenus Pentanthera (deciduous), and subgenus Tsutsuji (evergreen).
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Genus: Rhododendron (rhododendron)
Family: Ericaceae (various mostly lime-hating plants that thrive in acid soils)
Order: Ericales (ericales)
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Rhododendron 'Rosem Elegans'
Rhododendron
By front porch
(Cultivar). Rhododendrons are ornamental, acidic-soil loving broad-leaf evergreens. They grow best in partial shade. Rhododendron 'Roseum Elegans', produces stunning lilac pink flowers in numerous rounded trusses on a vigorous, upright and spreading shrub.
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Genus: Rhododendron (rhododendron)
Family: Ericaceae (various mostly lime-hating plants that thrive in acid soils)
Order: Ericales (ericales)
Shooting star
Dodecatheon meadia
Front, by altheas
This is one of the most beautiful spring wildflowers in the prairie. A colony of these plants in bloom is a sight not to be missed. Early pioneers called this plant 'Prairie Pointers. 'Shooting Star occurs in the majority of counties in Illinois (see Distribution Map). This plant is occasional to locally common in highClose-Up of Basal Leaves quality habitats, otherwise it is rare or absent. Habitats include moist to slightly dry black soil prairies, hill prairies, openings in rocky upland forests, limestone glades, bluffs along major rivers, fens, and abandoned fields.
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Genus: Dodecatheon (shooting stars)
Family: Primulaceae (primrose)
Order: Ericales (ericales)
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Garden Phlox
Phlox paniculata

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Genus: Phlox (Phlox)
Family: Polemoniaceae (phlox family)
Order: Ericales (ericales)
Moss Phlox
Phlox subulata
Rock gardens astride driveway
A perennial creeper growing to a height of 6 inches and covering a 20 inch wide area. The small, five-petaled flowers bloom in rose, mauve, blue, white, or pink in late spring to early summer.
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Genus: Phlox (Phlox)
Family: Polemoniaceae (phlox family)
Order: Ericales (ericales)
Cream False Indigo
Baptisia bracteata
Woods edge
This diminutive member of the Indigo group is treasured for its gorgeous clusters of lush cream flowers.The blooming of Cream False Indigo in midspring is a much-anticipated event at Prairie Nursery. Low-growing and compact, it creates a stunning effect when planted in large prairie meadows or small prairie gardens. Slow-growing and very long-lived, some plants at our nursery are nearly 30 years old! Grows in almost any well-drained soil. Does beautifully in full sun or light shade.
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Genus: Baptisia (baptisia)
Family: Fabaceae (legume family)
Order: Fabales (fabales)
White Wild Indigo
Baptisia lactea
Front meadow
This long-lived member of the Pea Family practically jumps out of the ground in spring.A well-established mature plant resembles an asparagus plant when it first appears and grows to five feet tall in a matter of days.Very striking, with cones of vivid white flowers that are visible far across the prairie landscape in June and July.The smooth bluegreen leaves are attractive all summer long.This slow-growing beauty is also one of the longest lived of all prairie plants.Transplants may require two years or more to reach maturity, while seeds can take four to five years.Worth waiting for, it is a real showpiece when in bloom! Grows on moderately-moist to semi-dry soils.Tolerates partial shade, but prefers full sun.
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Genus: Baptisia (baptisia)
Family: Fabaceae (legume family)
Order: Fabales (fabales)
Wild Senna
Cassia hebecarpa 
Bunches of butter-yellow flowers appear in July and August on the robust stems, reaching up to six feet tall.The attractive foliage is borne in large leaflets, typical of the Pea Family to which it belongs.The brown seedpods add interest in the fall and winter and are utilized by birds and other wildlife. Give this guy some room to spread out and it will repay you with an exuberance of foliage and blooms. Particularly fond of clay, it does well in medium to damp soils.Will tolerate periodic flooding.
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Genus: Cassia (legumes)
Family: Fabaceae (legume family)
Order: Fabales (fabales)
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Common milkweed
Asclepias syriaca
Southwest corner meadow; along drainage ditch
This species is native to most of North America east of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the drier parts of the Prairies. It grows in sandy soils and appreciates lots of sunlight. It was one of the earliest North American species described in Cornut's 1635 Canadensium plantarum historia. Failed attempts have been made to exploit rubber (from the latex) and fiber (from the seed's floss) production from the plant industrially. The floss was nonetheless used for stuffing and it has been found to be hypoallergenic. The plant has also been explored for commercial use of its bast (inner bark) fiber which is both strong and soft. Both the bast fiber and the floss were used historically by Native Americans for cordage and textiles. Milkweed oil from the seeds can be easily converted into cinamic acid which is a very potent sunscreen when used at a 1-5% concentration.
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Genus: Asclepias (milkweeds)
Family: Apocynaceae (dogbane)
Order: Gentianales (gentianales)
Butterfly weed
Asclepias tuberosa
Front meadow
An extremely hardy, long-lived perennial native to North America. The magnificent bright orange flowers are concentrated in compact clusters at the top of branching stems. The flowers produce a large quantity of nectar which attracts butterflies throughout the growing season.
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Genus: Asclepias (milkweeds)
Family: Apocynaceae (dogbane)
Order: Gentianales (gentianales)
Marsh milkweed
Asclepias incarnata,
North meadow back yard
One of the plants we bought in the Conservation Foundation silent auction. This species is cultivated frequently, especially in gardens designed to attract butterflies. The nectar of the plant attracts many other species of butterflies and insects as well.
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Genus: Asclepias (milkweeds)
Family: Apocynaceae (dogbane)
Order: Gentianales (gentianales)
Wild Geranium
Geranium maculatum
woods, meados
Wild Geranium is popular not only for its lovely lavender spring blooms, but also for its ruggedness and versatility. An excellent garden plant, it retains its attractive foliage all season long, unusual for a spring-blooming flower. Reaching one to two feet tall, it multiplies to form nice clumps. Grows in sun to shade, in dry and medium soil. Also thrives in full sun in a rich soil.
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Genus: Geranium (cranesbills)
Family: Geraniaceae (cranesbills and geraniums)
Order: Geranales (geranales)
butterfly bush
Buddleia davidii
north west corner hedge
fragrant blooms occur heavily from July through August, and continue abundantly until frost, and attracting many bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds (id tentative; need to check species)
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Genus: Buddleja (butterfly bush)
Family: Scrophulariaceae (figworts, scrofulaires)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Allegheny monkeyflower
Mimulus ringens
Rain garden @ nw corner
Eastern and central US and Canada
1-3 ft, june-sept blooming. Best naturalized in moist to wet soils in water gardens, bog gardens, wet meadows, water margins or low spots. May be grown in moist soils in borders as long as soils do not dry out. upright perennial which typically occurs in swampy areas, wet meadows, pond/streambanks and low woods. Typically grows 1-3' tall on erect, square, sometimes branching stems. Features lilac-purple, snapdragon-like flowers with two-lipped, open-mouthed corollas. Each flower purportedly resembles the face of a smiling monkey when squeezed.
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Genus: Mimulus (Monkeyflowers)
Family: Scrophulariaceae (figworts, scrofulaires)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Violets
Viola odorata
in lawn, largely near serviceberry
These form a carpet of purple and white in spring, survive year to year in lawn, not bothered by the occasional application of weed killer when the dandelions get out of hand
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Genus: Violaceae (Violets)
Family: Scrophulariaceae (figworts, scrofulaires)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Cat mint (catnip)
Nepeta cataria
Western meadow. Anybody want some? It is aggressive!
Attractive gray-green, oval leaves form mounds up to 2 feet high. Flowers are lavender-blue with purple spots, held in loose spikes. This is an aromatic plant which is adored by cats. As with many other herbs, this is a nice companion plant with roses. As will all members of the mint family, this is a vigorous, spreading plant.
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Genus: Nepeta (catmint)
Family: Lamiaceae (mint)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Wild bergamot
Monarda fistulosa
North meadow back yard
One of the plants we bought in the Conservation Foundation silent auction. Wild Bergamot or Beebalm, is a pleasantly scented member of the mint family growing up to 5 feet tall with rose-purple to lavender flowers.
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Genus: Monarda (bee balm, horsemint, oswego tea, or bergamot)
Family: Lamiaceae (mint)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Obedient Plant
Physostegia virginiana
Rain Garden, NW corner
Obedient plant is a stiffly erect perennial that grows from creeping rhizomes. The pale lavender-pink flowers are borne in showy spikes atop 2-4 ft (0.6-0.9 m) stalks in late summer and fall. Obedient plant is native to eastern North America from Quebec to Manitoba, and south to Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and Georgia. Obedient plant occurs in swamps, streambanks, ditches, seepages, damp meadows and prairies, moist open woodlands, bogs, and pine savannas.
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Genus: Physostegia (Obedient Plant)
Family: Lamiaceae (mint)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Forsythia 'Northern gold'
Forsythia sp cultivar
northwest corner bird hedge
The forsythia bush is a beautiful landscape shrub that grows into a hedge with naturally developing arching stems. Forsythia bushes are one of the earliest spring flowering plants. The blooms of the forsythia bush are a spectacular yellow or pink, depending on the cultivar, and resemble little bells.
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Genus: Forsythia (forsythia)
Family: Oleaceae (olive)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Blue vervain
verbena hastata
Rain garden @ nw corner
Native in lower 48 and canada
This is a slender, but erect, native perennial plant that is up to 5' tall. The flowers are often a pretty blue or violet, but they are quite small. Blue Vervain is easy to identify because it is the only vervain with elegant spikes of flowers in this color range. Various songbirds occasionally eat the seeds, including the Cardinal, Swamp Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Slate-Colored Junco (during the winter). The soil should consist of a fertile loam or wet muck. This plant tolerates standing water, if it is temporary. This is a good plant to locate near a small river or pond in a sunny location.
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Genus: Verbena (Verbena or vervain)
Family: Verbenaceae (Verbena or vervain)
Order: Lamiales (lamiales)
Labrador Violet
Viola labradorica
Along drive & around front central bed
Labrador Violet or Alpine Violet is an evergreen running herb. It is found in cold places such as Greenland and eastern Canada, including Labrador in Newfoundland and Labrador. The plant has smokey-purple and dark green leaves. The flowers are a rich lavender colour.

Genus: Viola (Violets)
Family: Violaceae (violets and pansies)
Order: Malpighiales (malpighiales)
Labrador Violet
Viola labradorica
around edges of coprolite bed
A leafy-stemmed violet, this perennial is 4-6 in. tall, with dainty, pale blue or purple flowers. The leaves have small, rounded teeth. Each plant usually has two to four flowering stalks. A low plant with leaves and light bluish-violet flowers on same stalk.
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Genus: Viola (Violets)
Family: Violaceae (violets and pansies)
Order: Malpighiales (malpighiales)
Rose of Sharon
Hibiscus syriacus
Front, south, by big bluestem
(exotic) Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus syriacus, isn't a rose, but its large, flat blossoms and nectar attract hummingbirds and tiny insects that hummers also eat. The flowers on this woody shrub come in several colors, including white, pink, purple, and red.
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Genus: Hibiscus (hibiscus)
Family: Malvaceae (mallow)
Order: Malvales (malvales)
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Serviceberry sp?
Amelanchier (laevis? Species tbd)
Back, by red oaks
Amelanchier, also known as shadbush, serviceberry, sarvisberry, juneberry, Saskatoon, shadblow, shadwood, sugarplum, and wild-plum, is a genus of about 20 species of shrubs and small deciduous trees in the Rosaceae (Rose family)
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Genus: Amelanchier (serviceberry)
Family: Rosaceae (rose family)
Order: Rosales (buckthorn, rose, elm, mulberry…)
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Black Cherry
Prunus serotina
Scattered in woods, mostlly near western edge. One near the two young hickories makes a spectacular display in fall
The Black Cherry is a pioneer species. In the Midwest, it is seen growing mostly in old fields with other sunlight loving species, such as Black Walnut, Black locust, and Hackberry. It is a moderately long-lived tree, with ages of up to 258 years known. The fruit is suitable for making jam, cherry pies and has some use in flavoring liqueurs; they are also a popular flavoring for sodas and used in many ice creams. The timber is valuable, perhaps the premier cabinetry timber of the U.S., traded as "cherry". It is known for its strong red color and high price.
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Genus: Prunus (plum)
Family: Rosaceae (rose family)
Order: Rosales (buckthorn, rose, elm, mulberry…)
Fort Sheridan Hawthorn
Crataegus sp
One specimen in the woods just east of the red oaks.
Crataegus species are shrubs or small trees, mostly growing to 5–15 metres (16–49 ft) tall,[4] with small pome fruit and (usually) thorny branches.
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Genus: Crataegus (Hawthorn)
Family: Rosaceae (rose family)
Order: Rosales (buckthorn, rose, elm, mulberry…)
Queen-of-the-Prairie
Filipendula rubra
Front meadow by ditch
Its native range extends from the Eastern to the Central United States, and grows in a wide range of shady and moist habitats.
This native perennial plant is unbranched and about 3-6' tall. The central stem is smooth and sometimes reddish. Each flower is about 1/3" across, consisting of 5 pink petals and numerous long white stamens with pink anthers. The overall appearance of the inflorescence resembles wind-tossed fluff or foam, and is quite beautiful. Queen-of-the-Prairie tends to form colonies under moist conditions.
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Genus: Filipendula ()
Family: Rosaceae (rose family)
Order: Rosales (buckthorn, rose, elm, mulberry…)
Maple Leaved Alum Root
Heuchera villosa
south edge under norway maples in front, also by red maple in back
Heuchera villosa 'Atropurpurea'combines burgundy foliage with stalks of long-blooming white flowers. This is one of the best plants for the woodland garden! Native to the Appalachian Mountains, this natural variation of the species is one of the largest of all the Alum Roots, with leaves up to a foot across. Grows one to two feet tall in rich, well-drained to slightly damp soil with good humus content. Blooms during the heat of August when most other woodland wildflowers are long gone.
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Genus: Heuchera (various North American herbaceous perennial plants)
Family: Saxifragaceae (perennial dicotyledonous herbs)
Order: Saxifragales (saxifragales)
Ditch Stonecrop
Penthorum sedoides
ditch - where else? Nw corner in drainage ditch
Ditch Stonecrop is fairly common and occurs in every county of Illinois. Habitats include openings in floodplain forests, swamps, marshes, muddy shores along rivers or ponds, and ditches along roadsides and railroads. The flowers are more or less green and not very showy while in bloom, but later the developing seed capsules turn red during the fall.
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Genus: Penthorum (ditch-stonecrop)
Family: Crassulaceae (Sedum)
Order: Saxifragales (saxifragales)
New Jersey tea
Ceanothus americanus
Front meadow, south meadow (big bluestem)
Habitats include mesic to dry black soil prairies, gravel prairies, hill prairies, Black Oak savannas, rocky upland forests, limestone glades, and barrens with stunted trees.
This low-growing, incredibly durable shrub is covered with clusters of bright white flowers in July and early August.The luxuriant, glossy leaves maintain their appearance all season long. Each plant grows two to three feet tall, with a diameter of up to three feet. Install plants two to three feet apart to create a low growing native hedge.The colonists used the leaves during the Revolutionary War as a substitute for regular tea following the Boston Tea Party, hence the name. Hummingbirds, being the predators that they are, will visit this plant regularly to eat the tiny insects that pollinate the flowers. Slow-growing, New Jersey Tea’s life span is measured in decades. Grows in almost any well-drained soil, in full sun or light shade
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Genus: Ceanothus (ceanothus)
Family: Rhamnaceae (buckthorn)
Order: Rhamnales (rhamnales)
Boxelder
Acer negundo
Woods - scattered, mostly at edges
Acer negundo is a small, usually fast-growing and fairly short-lived tree that grows up to 10-25 m tall, with a trunk diameter of 30-50 cm, rarely up to 1 m diameter. It often has several trunks and can form impenetrable thickets. The Boxelder Bug lays its eggs on all maples, but prefers this species (we have a colony of boxelder bugs that appears each spring).
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Genus: Acer (maples)
Family: Sapindaceae (sapindaceae)
Order: Sapindales (trees, including citrus, maples)
Silver maple
Acer saccharinum
Front; north side
Acer saccharinum, known as the silver maple is a species of maple native to eastern North America in the eastern United States and adjacent parts of southeast Canada. It is one of the most common trees in the United States.
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Genus: Acer (maples)
Family: Sapindaceae (sapindaceae)
Order: Sapindales (trees, including citrus, maples)
Red Maple
Acer rubrum
South side back yard
One of the most common and widespread deciduous trees of eastern North America. Iours is a really snaggly specimen crowded under the neighbor's elm. But it is beautiful in fall, and the woodpeckers like its many dead branches.
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Genus: Acer (maples)
Family: Sapindaceae (sapindaceae)
Order: Sapindales (trees, including citrus, maples)
Norway Maple
Acer platanoides
Front yard by porch
A deciduous tree growing to 20-30 m tall with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter, and a broad, rounded crown, native to eastern and central Europe and southwest Asia. Generally considered invasive.
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Genus: Acer (maples)
Family: Sapindaceae (sapindaceae)
Order: Sapindales (trees, including citrus, maples)
  localphoto  
White oak
Quercus alba
Back third - ~24 specimens
Eastern US
White oak can grow very large and live 3 to 5 centuries. It is a useful tree, producing edible acorns, (soak them first to wash out tannins), preferred by turkey and deer. The wood is used for "tight cooperage" and was used for whiskey barrels.
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Genus: Quercus (oaks)
Family: Fagaceae (beech)
Order: Fagales (woody plants)
Northern red oak
Quercus rubra
North edge, midway, two specimens
Widespread throughout Eastern U.S.
Red oak acorns are at the top of the food preference list for blue jays, wild turkeys, squirrels, small rodents, whitetail deer, raccoons, and black bears. Deer also browse the buds and twigs in wintertime.
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Genus: Quercus (oaks)
Family: Fagaceae (beech)
Order: Fagales (woody plants)
Bur oak
Quercus macrocarpa
South edge opposite red oaks - 2 specimens
The Bur Oak, sometimes spelled Burr Oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada. This plant is also called Mossycup oak and Mossycup white oak.
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Genus: Quercus (oaks)
Family: Fagaceae (beech)
Order: Fagales (woody plants)
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Pignut Hickory
Carya glabra
One large by north fence in woods; two younger at edge of woods. The woods are an "oak-hickory savannah."
Hickory wood is extremely tough, yet flexible, and is valued for tool handles, bows (like yew), wheel spokes, carts, drumsticks, lacrosse stick handles, golf club shafts (sometimes still called hickory stick, even though made of steel or graphite), the bottom of skis, walking sticks and for punitive use as a switch (like hazel), and especially as a cane-like hickory stick in schools. And is it ever tough! Splitting it into firewood is an adventure.
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Genus: Carya (hickory)
Family: Juglandaceae (walnut family)
Order: Fagales (woody plants)
Sweet Fern
Comptonia peregrina
On hill north side of driveway
US east of Mississippi R. south to Tn/NC
A small, aromatic mound-shaped shrub (not a fern) 2-4 ft. tall, occuring in dense colonies. Multiple stems with loose, spreading branches. Long, narrow, olive-green leaves, the edges of which have rolled back edges and rounded, fern-like division. Flowers are brown catkins that appear before the leaves unfold. A small nut is enclosed in a bur-like husk.
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Genus: Comptonia (Sweetfern)
Family: Myricaceae (a small family of dicotyledonous shrubs and small trees)
Order: Fagales (woody plants)
Small's penstemon
Penstemon smallii
Front central bed
Southeast US

Southeast US
  Distribution  
Genus: Penstemon (Beard-tongue)
Family: Plantaginaceae (plantain)
Order: Lamiales ()
Penstemon
Penstemon sp
North meadow back yard
One of the plants we bought in the Conservation Foundation silent auction. Penstemons are among the most attractive native flowers of North America,
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Genus: Penstemon (Beard-tongue)
Family: Plantaginaceae (plantain)
Order: Lamiales ()
White turtlehead
Chelone glabra
Rain garden @ nw corner near bench
Its native range extends from Georgia to Newfoundland and Labrador and from Mississippi to Manitoba.
Chelone (rhymes with "baloney") was a nymph in Greek mythology who insulted the gods by ridiculing or not attending (versions vary) the marriage of Zeus to Hera. The gods punished her by turning her into a turtle. Found along streambanks and wet low lying areas. Flowers are set in a cluster at the top of the stem. The blooms are tubed shaped with 2 "lips" with the top one overlapping the lower. Soil type; wet, sandy muck. 1-3 ft tall. Blooms july-aug. The flowers are white, borne in late summer and early fall. It can be used as a method of birth control, as used by Abenaki people. It is a food plant for the Macrophya nigra sawfly. Sawflies are a suborder of Hymenoptera (sawflies, wasps, bees and ants). They look more like flies than wasps, due to the thick "waist." Their larvae look and act like caterpillars. They date to the triassic period and are precursors to the bees, wasps, and ants. We look forward to spotting some on our turtlehead and adding them to Trillium Ridge's population index!
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Genus: Chelone ()
Family: Plantaginaceae (plantain)
Order: Lamiales ()

Index:
Allegheny monkeyflower Azalea Sp? Balsam ragwort Black Cherry Black eyed susan Blue vervain Boxelder Brown eyed susan Bur oak
butterfly bush Butterfly weed Calico Aster Cat mint (catnip) Common milkweed Compass plant Cream False Indigo Cupplant Ditch Stonecrop
Fire pink Forsythia 'Northern gold' Fort Sheridan Hawthorn Garden Phlox Golden Alexander Japanese Spurge Labrador Violet Labrador Violet Maple Leaved Alum Root
Marsh milkweed Moss Phlox Narrow-leaved purple coneflower New Jersey tea Northern red oak Norway Maple Obedient Plant Pale purple coneflower Penstemon
Pignut Hickory Prairie dock Purple coneflower Queen-of-the-Prairie Rattlesnake Master Red Maple Rhododendron 'Rosem Elegans' Rose of Sharon Serviceberry sp?
Shooting star Silver maple Small's penstemon Spotted Joe Pye weed Sweet Fern Sweet Joe Pye Weed Violets White oak White Snakeroot
White turtlehead White Wild Indigo Wild bergamot Wild Geranium Wild Senna Yellow coneflower